Colloquium (11/1/2012): Terry Au (University of Hong Kong)

Access to Childhood Language Memory

All adults seem to have amnesia about much that happened in their childhood. Does early memory simply wither away through massive synaptic pruning and cell death in early brain development? Or, is it just masked by interference from later experience? This talk explores these questions in the specific case of childhood language memory. Research into the re-learning of long-disused childhood languages turns out to have much to offer. It provides relatively objective evidence for access to early childhood memory in adulthood via re-learning. It complements linguistic deprivation research to highlight the special status of childhood language experience in phonology and morphosyntax acquisition. It thereby suggests a strategy to salvage seemingly forgotten childhood languages, which are often also heritage languages. Equally importantly, re-learning childhood languages may well open a window onto how language affects cognitive development not only during, but also well beyond, the childhood years.