LingLang Lunch (9/18/2013): Eva Wittenberg (Tufts University)

Close but no cigar: The differences between kissing, giving kisses, and giving other things

Light verb constructions, such as “Julius is giving Ellie a kiss”, create a mismatch at the syntax-semantics interface. Typically, each argument in a sentence corresponds to one semantic role, such as in “Julius is giving Ellie a present”, where Julius is the Source, Ellie the Goal, and the present the Theme. However, a light verb construction such as “Julius is giving Ellie a kiss” with three arguments describes the same event as the transitive “Julius kissed Ellie” with two arguments: Julius is the Agent, and Ellie the Patient.
This leads to several questions: First, how are light verb constructions such as “giving a kiss” processed differently from sentences such as “giving a present” ? Second, at which structural level of representation would we find sources of this difference? Third, what is the effect of using a light verb construction such as “giving a kiss” as opposed to “kissing” on the event representation created in a listener? I will present data from an ERP study, an eye-tracking study, and several behavioral studies to answer these questions.